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Law enforcement officials, Malik Adams’ family meeting about grand jury results

By Jeff Gallatin

North Olmsted

Law enforcement officials were scheduled to meet yesterday with the family of Malik Adams – the 15-year-old North Olmsted teenager killed in a May 2 hit-skip incident on Brookpark Road – to explain the evidence presented to the Cuyahoga County grand jury last week when that panel chose not to indict the man who had turned himself in a few days after the incident after seeing media coverage of Adams’ death.

Officials said the Cuyahoga County grand jury last week chose not to indict a Cleveland man in his 50s who turned himself in to North Olmsted City police a few days after Adams died as a result of being hit by a car late May 2 on Brookpark Road near Wal-Mart.

Representatives from the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor’s office and North Olmsted Police Department were set to meet with Adams’ family later in the day Tuesday after West Life’s print edition went to press.

Kent Bowden, a spokesman for the Adams family, said the family still has questions it would like answered.

“We’re upset and saddened by all this,” he said. “We’d like to know what happened not only with the accident, but after the grand jury failed to indict the man after he turned himself in.”

Bowden said the family has major concerns about what it sees as dark and inadequate lighting in the Brookpark Road area near where the accident took place.

He said the family wanted to hear what the officials had to say during the meeting.

Referring to the results of the grand jury, Joe Frolik, the spokesman for the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor’s office, said the grand jury returned the “no true bill” charge against the man after considering the evidence presented to it. The action comes after months of investigation by North Olmsted police, the county prosecutor’s office and the Cuyahoga County Coroner’s office.

Frolik offered limited information on the man who had turned himself into police, noting information presented in grand jury proceedings is not made public. Frolik said he didn’t think any other charges in the case would be considered.

Noting the different agencies involved as well as the length of time of the investigation, Frolik said the prosecutor’s office is satisfied with the investigation.

“The people involved in the prosecutor’s office feel it was a very thorough and complete investigation,” Frolik said. “There was a lot of cooperation between different agencies involved.”

North Olmsted police Chief Jamie Gallagher said the investigation was handled professionally.

“A lot of work went into it, not only at our end but at the prosecutor and coroner’s office as well,” Gallagher said. “There were a series of tests conducted by the different agencies as well as a lot of interviews and man hours put into checking on this case, with the resulting investigation being presented to the county grand jury.”

Gallagher said the officials know it has been hard for Adams’ family and friends.

“Our thoughts go out to the Adams family and friends because of the loss they’ve suffered,” he said.

Officials said the Cleveland man had turned himself into police May 10 after seeing the media coverage of Adams’ death. People in North Olmsted and surrounding communities had raised funds and offered support to the Adams family and their friends after the death of the North Olmsted High School student.

 

 

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