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Moen receives national WaterSense award from EPA

For Moen, a set of impressive numbers led to the North Olmsted firm receiving a national award.

Federal EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson toured Moen’s North Olmsted facilities prior to a press conference honoring the business for being a 2010 WaterSense Partner of the Year. The award is given for outstanding water conservation efforts in the WaterSense program.

Jackson, the first African-American to head the EPA, toured Moen’s lab facilities and testing area and spoke to workers and other people taking the tour. Among others present were Mike Bauer, president of Moen’s United States businesses, Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald, North Olmsted Safety Service Director Scott Thomas and WaterSense Outreach Coordinator Stephanie Thornton.

Both Bauer and Jackson cited strong numbers when referring to the award and Moen’s strong standing in the business community.

“Fifty million. That’s the number of gallons of water that Moen saves annually by recycling the water we use in testing here in this building,” Bauer said. “Two hundred seventy: Moen offers 270 lavatory faucets that are certified to meet the EPA’s WaterSense criteria. Seventy: that’s the number of WaterSense-certified showerheads in Moen’s portfolio.”

Bauer noted that Moen was one of only four companies to receive the award from the EPA while also saying all of the business’s lavatory faucets meet WaterSense standards.

“You can’t get much better than that – 100 percent of Moen’s single and multifamily residential lavatory faucets meet WaterSense criteria,” he said, adding that all those products would continue to be designed in the future to meet those criteria.

Bauer said Moen would continue to develop more WaterSense-compliant products and save additional water in the future.

“We realize that everything we do has a dramatic impact on future generations and how we use our precious natural resources – particularly water,” he said. “Moen continues to make aggressive capital investments to innovate, increase efficiency and ensure our products are being made with the safest, most effective materials and processes currently available.”

Bauer said Moen has forged many key partnerships with environmental organizations and building alliances to promote and advance sustainability. Among those cited were the U.S. Green Building Council, National Association of Home Builders, National Sanitation Foundation International, North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources and the EPA.

Bauer said Moen will also continue to make taking care of its customers its primary goal.

“Above all, Moen continues to make it easy for consumers and our professi0nal trade customers to make responsible choices by developing stylish, reliable products that save water without sacrificing performance,” he said.

Jackson said water conservation has come a long way.

“More than 40 years ago, the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland was polluted with industrial waste and raw sewage,” she said. “Nearby Lake Erie had been declared dead because it was too contaminated to support aquatic life. In Washington, D.C., pollution in the Potomac (River) was so heavy that you could smell it in the city on hot days. Eighty-five to 90 percent of water systems had little or no information on what bacteria or chemicals might be in the water they delivered.”

Jackson said Congress came together and created bipartisan solutions like the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act and Ocean Dumping Ban ac,t which have resulted in cleaner water.

FitzGerald lauded the EPA as a strong partner for the county in many areas, be it water conservation, bettering Lake Erie or working on brownfields.

Thomas said later Moen should be commended.

“Moen’s a fine company and provides many benefits to the area by being in North Olmsted,” he said. “It’s a well-deserved honor and we’re fortunate to have them here.”

 

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