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Frost: get ‘big government’ out of people’s way

Rob Frost

Rob Frost

Cuyahoga County Republican Party Chairman Rob Frost has vowed to represent the people of Northeast Ohio, not outside interests, and to attract jobs if elected to the District 10 Congressional seat.

Formerly one of two Republicans on the Cuyahoga Board of Elections, Frost, 42, resigned on April 4, and has formed a federal campaign committee with the intention of facing incumbent Democrat Dennis Kucinich on the November ballot. A Lakewood resident, Frost said he actually lives near the congressman.

“The situation in Northeast Ohio in general, is that we need to have someone to represent and to grow jobs,” Frost said in a recent interview.

Frost served as a Rocky River City Councilman from 2001 until 2006, when he was appointed to the Board of Elections. His father, Robert Frost was also a councilman in that city in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

“We need to get big government out of the way and help people to keep their hard earned money,” Frost stated, adding that less regulation is needed from the government. He said that while there are jobs available, people need access to the proper training to fill them.

One of the major points of Frost’s campaign will be the representation of district constituents, something he said that Kucinich has failed to do. “The last time he ran, 87 percent of his campaign funds came from out of state. The congressman is catering to the interests of his Hollywood friends,” Frost said.

A news release from his campaign committee stated that of the $214,361 raised by Kucinich’s re-election fund in the first quarter of the year, exactly $1,000 came from donors within the 10th district. It also said that the congressman, in his eighth term, was fined $52,443 by the federal election commission earlier this year for improper use of public matching funds in his ill-fated 2004 presidential campaign.

Some believe Republicans are in a precarious position in Ohio, due to what has been interpreted as anti-middle class legislation from the state. Kucinich has long been thought of as a champion of the average voter, but Frost sees him as being in a vulnerable position. He said the congressman’s policies have been ineffective. “Clearly, his philosophy is one of larger government,” he said.

Frost added that alternatives must be found for the government’s ever increasing debt. “You can’t keep going back to the same well; we can’t saddle future generations with this debt,” he stated, adding that Democrats have used one time stimulus funding to bolster ongoing projects, such as education.

Regarding the controversial Ohio collective bargaining law, Frost said, that while organized labor “has no business in education,” the bill is not fair to safety forces and needs some adjusting in that area. He added that some kind of reform regarding public union contracts is needed.

Above all, Frost said that the number one concern is jobs. “Any other issue becomes a lot easier when you have a good-paying job,” he said.

 

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