Lakewood OH
Mostly cloudy
73°F
 

Boss warehouse project has strong foundation

By Jeff Gallatin

North Olmsted

Just like when he is one of the first people to step forward when something needs to be done in the community, North Olmsted businessman Jack Boss will be a trendsetter with his use of pervious concrete at the site of the new warehouse he is building at his Lorain Road headquarters.

City Council gave final approval to the project after it was recommended by council’s Building, Zoning and Development panel in August.

City Planning and Development Director Kim Wenger lauded Boss’ longtime willingness to help with a variety of projects around the city.

“Jack Boss and Boss Concrete have been an important part of the North Olmsted business community for decades,” Wenger said. “His plans for the construction of a new office warehouse for his company in North Olmsted show his commitment to this area.”

Wenger said his use of pervious concrete also shows his willingness to be in the forefront of concrete and construction work. (According to Wikipedia, pervious concrete is a special type of concrete with a high porosity used for concrete flatwork which allows water from precipitation and other sources to pass directly through thereby reducing the runoff from the site and allowing groundwater recharge).

“His innovative use of green practices, perhaps the first commercial use of pervious concrete in the city, may become a model for future development practices,” Wenger said.

Boss said adding the warehouse will provide straightforward benefits to the business, which has been in his family for more than 50 years.

“It will allow me to store all my equipment indoors,” he said. “That will be a big help.”

Boss said he already has some of the pervious concrete down at the business site and that it’s as advertised with the water and precipitation. He said since there is sloping on some of the property, the pervious concrete will help with the water.

“It does a good job,” he said. “It will make that project a lot better.”

Boss said the project will take between one to two years. Since he bought the property in 2010, he has already been busy.

“I’ve been clearing a lot of the stuff out that whoever was here before left,” he said. “I’ve had dumpsters in here and we’re clearing out scrap and other debris that’s in here.”

He said the next step will be leveling the property where the warehouse foundation will be going.

“After we get that level, we can get the foundation down,” he said. “It will sit and we’ll make sure it’s in there properly without problems. Then after a year, we’ll get the rest of the construction done.”

Paul Barker, chairman of city council’s Finance Committee, said the use of pervious concrete as well as the project as a whole will benefit the city.

“Mr. Boss told me about this type of concrete about a year ago when we had some discussions about the project,” Barker said. “It sounds great and hopefully will help lead its use in a lot of projects in the city in future years. And getting something like the project done is also a benefit to the city. Mr. Boss has always been willing to help out around the community when needed and now he’s making a big investment in it with this project, which we appreciate.”

 

 

Archives